From Monday Note

For quite a while, I’ve been advocating a newspapers price hike. My take: the news market is undergoing an irreversible split. On one side, digital distribution (on web, mobile and tablets) will thrive through higher volumes and deeper penetration; revenue is not easy to squeeze out of digital subscribers and advertisers but, as some consolation, serving one or ten million customers costs about the same.

On the other side, print is built on a different equation: gaining audience is costly; every additional reader comes with tangible industrial costs (printing, shipping, home delivery). Having said that, each print reader carries a much better ARPU than its online counterpart (bet on a 5 to 15 times higher yield, depending on the product). And, for a long time, there will be a significant share of the audience that will favor the print version, regardless of price (almost). Those are super loyal and super solvent readers.

Last week, my little solo tune about price hikes received independent support of people much better equipped to define prices and value. Global marketing consultants Simon-Kucher & Partners released conclusions from an in-depth study of newspaper price evolution and its impact on circulation (PDF summary here).

The headline: “Calling all newspapers: A premium model is your best hope”, which the authors, Andre Weber and Kyle Poyar, sum up thusly:

Newspapers are in an unenviable, but not uncommon position: raising print prices may shrink their already anemic readership base, but may also be their best hope for staying afloat.

Read the Full Story>>

Share →